Showing the way: Ethiopia to cut carbon emissions by two-thirds by 2030, leads rest of the world in setting targets

Addis Ababa has the most ambitious plan to date presented to the United Nations Climate Change Conference, which begins in November.

ETHIOPIA has set targets to slash carbon emissions by two-thirds within the next 15 years, the most ambitious goal so far presented to an upcoming UN climate change conference in Paris.

“Ethiopia intends to achieve its vision of becoming carbon-neutral, with the mid-term goal of attaining middle-income status,” according to a statement published on the website of the UN convention on climate change.

Addis Ababa has set a target to reduce its emissions of greenhouse gases by 64% by 2030, the most ambitious plan to date presented to the United Nations Climate Change Conference, which begins in November.

Ethiopia said it plans to cut emissions by adopting cleaner practices in agriculture, construction and transport, as well as slowing deforestation.

More than three-quarters of Ethiopians have no access to electricity, and depend entirely on wood stoves—a major source of carbon dioxide.

The Ethiopian government has launched major infrastructure projects to increase renewable energy production, including the giant Grand Renaissance dam on the Blue Nile river, to produce 6,000 MW when completed in 2017.

Ethiopia has also built several wind farms and geothermal projects in recent years.

“Ethiopia’s strategy to build a climate resilient green economy is showing the way to rich countries—from Australia to Japan—who have yet to announce their final countries commitments ahead of the critical climate summit in Paris,” said Tim Gore, Oxfam’s international climate adviser.

Ethiopia is the twelfth country worldwide and the third African nation to submit its contribution to the climate conference in Paris.

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